• (+234) 8033170877, (+234) 8188246453
  • KM 3, East-West RD, Nkpolu, Port-Harcourt, Nigeria
  • info@wellman-wellington.org

News

New green materials could power smart devices using ambient light

We are increasingly using more smart devices like smartphones, smart speakers, and wearable health and wellness sensors in our homes, offices, and public buildings. However, the batteries they use can deplete quickly and contain toxic and rare environmentally damaging chemicals, so researchers are looking for better ways to power the devices. One way to power them is by converting indoor light from ordinary bulbs into energy, in a similar way to how solar panels harvest energy from sunlight, known as solar photovoltaics. However, due to the different properties of the light sources, the materials used for solar panels are not suitable for harvesting indoor light.…

First digital single-chip millimeter-wave beamformer will exploit 5G capabilities

The first fully integrated single-chip digital millimeter-wave (MMW) beamformer, created by electrical and computer engineers at the University of Michigan, opens up new possibilities in high-frequency 5G communications. The technology could be used to improve vehicle-to-vehicle communication, autonomous driving, satellite internet, and national defense, to name a few. Beamforming allows a device that is transmitting signals to point them in a particular direction, as opposed to having the signals radiate out in all directions—which can lead to significant interference and loss of efficiency. It is an essential technique for MMW communication, which occurs at a relatively high frequency (typically between 24GHz and 100GHz). This high frequency communication allows for high-speed data transfer, one of the key advantages of 5G.…

Stretchable 'skin' sensor gives robots human sensation

It's not a stretch to say that stretchable sensors could change the way soft robots function and feel. In fact, they will be able to feel quite a lot. Cornell University researchers have created a fiber-optic sensor that combines low-cost LEDs and dyes, resulting in a stretchable "skin" that detects deformations such as pressure, bending and strain. This sensor could give soft robotic systems—and anyone using augmented reality technology—the ability to feel the same rich, tactile sensations that mammals depend on to navigate the natural world. The researchers, led by Rob Shepherd, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, are working to commercialize the technology for physical therapy and sports medicine.…

Accurate, faster hydraulics models for safer drilling for oil and gas

Ph.D. candidate Mohammad Hossein Abbasi of the TU/e Department of Mathematics and Computer Science has developed numerical tools to support the safer, cheaper and more efficient drilling of deep wells for exploitation of natural resources. His models are accurate enough for virtual drilling scenario testing and drilling automation, and speed up simulations up to 70 times. Drilling of deep wells offers enormous value for global economies, for instance for the exploration of minerals, geothermal energy, oil and gas. However, the remaining reserves of these resources are increasingly found in difficult-to-access, unconventional places, and their exploitation needs to be balanced with environmental concerns and the high cost of drilling operations. The models Abbasi developed are a big step toward revolutionary advances in operational and environmental safety and cost-effectiveness of resource exploration.…

Virgin's Hyperloop carries passengers for the first time

The Virgin Hyperloop made its first journey carrying passengers Sunday, in a test the company claimed represented a major step forward for the "groundbreaking" technology capable of transporting people at 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) an hour. The Hyperloop is intended to carry passengers in small pods through a vacuum tube, with proponents arguing it could revolutionize high-speed travel. Virgin says the Hyperloop will be able to reach top speeds of 1,080 kilometers an hour (671 mph)—projecting a 45-minute journey from Los Angeles to San Francisco—and will produce no carbon emissions. But until Sunday the technology, first proposed by eccentric US tech magnate Elon Musk in 2012, had not been tested with people on board. Two Virgin employees made the 500-meter journey in a two-person vehicle in just 15 seconds at a test site in the Nevada desert..…

Grasping empathy: How new technology helps simulate children's experiences

As an adult, it's hard to imagine how children experience a world built for grownups. What is it really like for someone lower to the ground, with shorter limbs and smaller hands, to navigate a home, a school, or a park? Everyone from toy designers and teachers to doctors and parents could benefit from a realistic few minutes in a child's shoes. In a series of research projects, University of Chicago postdoctoral researcher Jun Nishida has explored new technologies that help people experience the point of view of others unlike themselves. Working in the Human Computer Integration Lab of Pedro Lopes—an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science—Nishida's latest project, HandMorph, uses a wearable exoskeleton to simulate the hand of a child, reducing its wearer's grasp. In October, the work received the Best Paper award at the 2020 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST), one of the world's premier human-computer interaction conferences.…